Within and Without opens -Pakistan Press Foundation (PPF)

Paksitan Press Foundtion

Within and Without opens

KARACHI: It may be a hackneyed statement but it’s true: artists are interpreters of life. Not that an ordinary person, or a non-artist, cannot interpret life. Artists give tongue to those thoughts and ideas that others find hard to articulate. They express the inexpressible in aesthetically pleasing and contextually meaningful ways. This can be observed by visiting an exhibition of four artists’ work titled ‘Within and Without’ at the Full Circle Art Gallery.

The title of the show suggests that the artists have tried to explore the concealed and apparent worlds within an individual. And once the viewer starts perusing the exhibits, it becomes quite difficult not to appreciate the delightful combination of sensitivity and imaginativeness with which all of them have tried to convey their message.

Scheherezade Junejo impresses with her content and technique in equal measure. The first piece ‘Diametrically Opposite’ (pencil on paper) startles the viewer with its visual candour and remarkable use of lines. But it is ‘Idealist’ (pencil on paper) that has much to ponder over.
The missing lower half of the body reminds the viewer of a famous line, “but to the girdle do the gods inherit, beneath is all the fiends”. The finesse in the artist’s work will hold her in good stead in the time to come.

Suleman Khilji discusses the issue of clarity and haziness through series called ‘Snowing’ and ‘Bubbles’ (mixed media on Morocco sheets).
Quite interestingly, he employs colours, such as blue, that are usually not used to express such a feeling and does so successfully. ‘Snowing 1’ is a wonderful work of art. However, he takes his art to the next level with ‘2013’ by coming up with a different kind of exhibit without deviating from the theme. The smoke replaces the foggy effect of the snow.

Annem Zaidi tells a story with her work beginning with ‘Conflicting Thoughts’ (oil on canvas) passing through phases like ‘Not Again’, ‘Indulgence’ and ‘Leaving it Behind’. ‘Gone’ may or may not be the last piece in the series. The darkness that envelops her subject is a give-away. There is a reason that the face of the protagonist is protected. The viewer has to find that out.

Dua Abbas revisits some historic characters from the world of art and literature. Her ‘Ophelia in Three Parts’ (pastel and pencil on paper) is a standout exhibit. It is perhaps a scene when Ophelia is about to sing some mad songs or has already sung them. The water beneath her feet speaks well for the artist’s understanding of the emotional state of the character.

The exhibition will remain open till June 1.


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